Annals of Surgical Oncology

, Volume 11, Issue 11, pp 977–982

Microsatellite Instability as a Prognostic Factor in Resected Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases

  • Riad Haddad
  • Robert T. Ogilvie
  • Marina Croitoru
  • Victoria Muniz
  • Robert Gryfe
  • Aaron Pollet
  • Preshanthini Shanmugathasan
  • Timothy Fitzgerald
  • Calvin H. L. Law
  • Sherif S. Hanna
  • Serge Jothy
  • Mark Redston
  • Steven Gallinger
  • Andrew J. Smith
Original Articles

DOI: 10.1245/ASO.2004.03.585

Cite this article as:
Haddad, R., Ogilvie, R.T., Croitoru, M. et al. Ann Surg Oncol (2004) 11: 977. doi:10.1245/ASO.2004.03.585

Abstract

Background: Two distinct genetic mutational pathways characterized by either chromosomal instability or high-frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H) are currently recognized in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Recently, it has been shown that patients with primary CRC that displays MSI-H have a significant, stage-independent, multivariate survival advantage. Untreated CRC hepatic metastases are incurable and are associated with a median survival of 4 to 12 months. Conversely, surgical resection in selected patients results in a 20% to 50% cure rate. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic importance of MSI-H in patients undergoing resection of hepatic CRC metastases.

Methods: DNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded, resected metastatic CRC liver lesions and corresponding normal liver parenchyma from 190 patients. MSI-H status was determined by polymerase chain reaction–based evaluation of the noncoding mononucleotide repeats BAT-25 and BAT-26.

Results: MSI was detected in tumors from 5 (2.7%) of the 190 CRC patients. All MSI-H tumors were in patients with node-positive CRC primary tumors. The median survival after hepatic resection of MSI-H and non–MSI-H tumors was 67 and 61 months, respectively (P = .9).

Conclusions: These data suggest that MSI-H is not a common feature in resected CRC liver metastases and do not suggest a role for MSI in stratifying good versus poor prognosis in these patients.

Key Words:

Microsatellite instability Colorectal cancer Hepatic metastases Molecular markers 

Copyright information

© The Society of Surgical Oncology, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Riad Haddad
    • 1
    • 2
  • Robert T. Ogilvie
    • 3
    • 4
  • Marina Croitoru
    • 1
  • Victoria Muniz
    • 1
  • Robert Gryfe
    • 1
    • 2
  • Aaron Pollet
    • 2
    • 4
  • Preshanthini Shanmugathasan
    • 3
  • Timothy Fitzgerald
    • 2
    • 3
  • Calvin H. L. Law
    • 2
    • 3
  • Sherif S. Hanna
    • 2
    • 3
  • Serge Jothy
    • 3
  • Mark Redston
    • 2
    • 4
  • Steven Gallinger
    • 1
    • 2
  • Andrew J. Smith
    • 2
    • 3
    • 5
  1. 1.Centre for Cancer GeneticsSamuel Lunenfeld Research InstituteTorontoCanada
  2. 2.University of TorontoTorontoCanada
  3. 3.Sunnybrook and Women’s Health Sciences CentreTorontoCanada
  4. 4.Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, Mount Sinai HospitalTorontoCanada
  5. 5.Sunnybrook and Women’s Health Sciences CentreTorontoCanada