AAPS PharmSciTech

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 62–76

Recent Advances in Lipid Nanoparticle Formulations with Solid Matrix for Oral Drug Delivery

Authors

    • Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences, Agency for Science, Technology and Research
  • Anumita Chaudhury
    • Department of PharmacyNational University of Singapore
Review Article Theme: Advanced Technologies for Oral Controlled Release

DOI: 10.1208/s12249-010-9563-0

Cite this article as:
Das, S. & Chaudhury, A. AAPS PharmSciTech (2011) 12: 62. doi:10.1208/s12249-010-9563-0

Abstract

Lipid nanoparticles based on solid matrix have emerged as potential drug carriers to improve gastrointestinal (GI) absorption and oral bioavailability of several drugs, especially lipophilic compounds. These formulations may also be used for sustained drug release. Solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) and the newer generation lipid nanoparticle, nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC), have been studied for their capability as oral drug carriers. Biodegradable, biocompatible, and physiological lipids are generally used to prepare these nanoparticles. Hence, toxicity problems related with the polymeric nanoparticles can be minimized. Furthermore, stability of the formulations might increase than other liquid nano-carriers due to the solid matrix of these lipid nanoparticles. These nanoparticles can be produced by different formulation techniques. Scaling up of the production process from lab scale to industrial scale can be easily achieved. Reasonably high drug encapsulation efficiency of the nanoparticles was documented. Oral absorption and bioavailability of several drugs were improved after oral administration of the drug-loaded SLNs or NLCs. In this review, pros and cons, different formulation and characterization techniques, drug incorporation models, GI absorption and oral bioavailability enhancement mechanisms, stability and storage condition of the formulations, and recent advances in oral delivery of the lipid nanoparticles based on solid matrix will be discussed.

Key words

bioavailability gastrointestinal absorption lipid nanoparticle oral delivery

Copyright information

© American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists 2010