International Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, 13:286

Benefits of the uncertainty management intervention for African American and white older breast cancer survivors: 20-Month Outcomes

Authors

    • Department of PsychologyUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    • School of NursingUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Michael Belyea
    • School of NursingUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Barbara Germino
    • School of NursingUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Laura S. Porter
    • Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesDuke University Medical Center
  • Margaret Clayton
    • School of NursingUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Article

DOI: 10.1207/s15327558ijbm1304_3

Cite this article as:
Gil, K.M., Mishel, M.H., Belyea, M. et al. Int. J. Behav. Med. (2006) 13: 286. doi:10.1207/s15327558ijbm1304_3

Abstract

In a 2 x 2 randomized block repeated measure design, this study evaluated the follow-up efficacy of the uncertainty management intervention at 20 months. The sample included 483 recurrence-free women (342 White, 141 African American women; mean age = 64 years) who were 5-9 years posttreatment for breast cancer. Women were randomly assigned to either the intervention or usual care control condition. The intervention was delivered during 4 weekly telephone sessions in which survivors were guided in the use of audiotaped cognitive-behavioral strategies and a self-help manual. Repeated measures MANOVAs evaluating treatment group, ethnic group, and treatment by ethnic interaction effects at 20 months indicated that training in uncertainty management resulted in improvements in cognitive reframing, cancer knowledge, and a variety of coping skills. Importantly, the 20-month outcomes also demonstrated benefits for women in the intervention condition in terms of declines in illness uncertainty and stable effects in personal growth over time.

Key words

breast cancercancer survivorshipuncertainty managementpersonalgrowth

Copyright information

© International Society of Behavioral Medicine 2006