Article

International Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 12, Issue 4, pp 266-272

Self-efficacy and motivation to quit during participation in a smoking cessation program

  • Thuy BoardmanAffiliated withDepartment of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Kansas Medical CenterDepartment of Psychology, University of Kansas
  • , Delwyn CatleyAffiliated withDepartment of Psychology, University of Missouri-Kansas City Email author 
  • , Matthew S. MayoAffiliated withDepartment of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Kansas Masonic Cancer Research Institute, University of Kansas Medical Center
  • , Jasjit S. AhluwaliaAffiliated withDepartment of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Kansas Masonic Cancer Research InstituteDepartment of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center

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Abstract

The associations between failure to quit and posttreatment self-efficacy and motivation were examined among 600 African American smokers enrolled in a randomized trial testing the efficacy of bupropion for smoking cessation. Participants also received brief motivational counseling and were followed for 6 months. Baseline levels of self-efficacy and motivation for all participants were high (8.2 and 8.5 on a 10-point scale, respectively). Longitudinal analyses indicated that smokers who failed to quit were less likely than quitters to report high self-efficacy and motivation from posttreatment to follow-up. However, examination of mean self-efficacy and motivation scores at posttreatment and follow-up revealed that smokers continued to sustain high self-efficacy and motivation. Mean self-efficacy and motivation scores differed by less than 1 point from baseline levels, even though the majority of participants failed to quit smoking. Results suggest that unsuccessful participation in a smoking cessation program does not meaningfully reduce smokers’ self-efficacy and motivation to quit.

Key words

motivation self-efficacy smoking cessation failure African American smokers