International Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, 12:266

Self-efficacy and motivation to quit during participation in a smoking cessation program

  • Thuy Boardman
  • Delwyn Catley
  • Matthew S. Mayo
  • Jasjit S. Ahluwalia
Article

DOI: 10.1207/s15327558ijbm1204_7

Cite this article as:
Boardman, T., Catley, D., Mayo, M.S. et al. Int. J. Behav. Med. (2005) 12: 266. doi:10.1207/s15327558ijbm1204_7
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Abstract

The associations between failure to quit and posttreatment self-efficacy and motivation were examined among 600 African American smokers enrolled in a randomized trial testing the efficacy of bupropion for smoking cessation. Participants also received brief motivational counseling and were followed for 6 months. Baseline levels of self-efficacy and motivation for all participants were high (8.2 and 8.5 on a 10-point scale, respectively). Longitudinal analyses indicated that smokers who failed to quit were less likely than quitters to report high self-efficacy and motivation from posttreatment to follow-up. However, examination of mean self-efficacy and motivation scores at posttreatment and follow-up revealed that smokers continued to sustain high self-efficacy and motivation. Mean self-efficacy and motivation scores differed by less than 1 point from baseline levels, even though the majority of participants failed to quit smoking. Results suggest that unsuccessful participation in a smoking cessation program does not meaningfully reduce smokers’ self-efficacy and motivation to quit.

Key words

motivationself-efficacysmoking cessationfailureAfrican Americansmokers

Copyright information

© International Society of Behavioral Medicine 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thuy Boardman
    • 1
    • 2
  • Delwyn Catley
    • 3
  • Matthew S. Mayo
    • 4
  • Jasjit S. Ahluwalia
    • 5
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public HealthUniversity of Kansas Medical CenterKansas City
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of KansasKansas City
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Missouri-Kansas CityKansas City
  4. 4.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public HealthKansas Masonic Cancer Research Institute, University of Kansas Medical CenterKansas City
  5. 5.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public HealthKansas Masonic Cancer Research InstituteKansas City
  6. 6.Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of Kansas Medical CenterKansas City