Annals of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 24, Issue 4, pp 310–319

Motivational versus social cognitive interventions for promoting fruit and vegetable intake and physical activity in African American Adolescents

  • Dawn K. Wilson
  • Ronald Friend
  • Nicole Teasley
  • Sabra Green
  • Irvine Lee Reaves
  • Domenic A. Sica
Article

DOI: 10.1207/S15324796ABM2404_07

Cite this article as:
Wilson, D.K., Friend, R., Teasley, N. et al. ann. behav. med. (2002) 24: 310. doi:10.1207/S15324796ABM2404_07

Abstract

Strategic self-presentation (motivational intervention [MI]) is a theoretical approach that is distinct from social cognitive theory (SCT). Specifically, strategic self-presentation involves increasing motivation by creating cognitive dissonance and inducing shifts in self-concept by generating positive coping strategies during a videotaped session. Fifty-three healthy African American adolescents were randomized to a SCT + MI, SCT-only, or an education-only group for increasing fruit and vegetable (F&V) intake and physical activity. The SCT + MI and SCT-only groups received a 12-week SCT program. Students in the SCT+ MI group also participated in a strategic self-presentation videotape session. Participantscompleted3-dayfoodrecords, completedmeasures of self-concept and self-efficacy, and wore an activity monitor for 4 days atpre-and posttreatment. Both the SCT+MI (2.6 ± 1.4vs. 5.7 ± 2.2, p<. 05) andthe SCT-only (2.5 ± 1.2 vs. 4.8 ± 2.4, p <. 05) groups showed greater increases in F&V intake from pre-to posttreatment as compared with the education-only group (2.3 ± 1.0, vs. 3.3 ± 2.1, p > .05). There were no significant time or group effects for any of the physical activity measures. Correlation analyses revealed that only the SCT + MI group showed that dietary self-concept (r = .58,r = .67,p<.05) and dietary self-efficacy (r = .65, r = .85, p < .05) were significantly correlated with posttreatment F&V intake and change in F&V intake, respectively. These findings suggest that the change in F&V intake in the SCT + MI group resulted from strategic self-presentation, which induced positive shifts in self-concept and self-efficacy.

Copyright information

© The Society of Behavioral Medicine 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dawn K. Wilson
    • 1
  • Ronald Friend
    • 2
  • Nicole Teasley
    • 3
  • Sabra Green
    • 3
  • Irvine Lee Reaves
    • 4
  • Domenic A. Sica
    • 5
  1. 1.Prevention Research Center, and Department of Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior, Norman J. Arnold School of Public HealthUniversity of South CarolinaColumbia
  2. 2.State University of New York at Stony BrookUSA
  3. 3.Medical College of VirginiaVirginia Commonwealth UniversityUSA
  4. 4.Team-Up Richmond RichmondVirginia
  5. 5.Medical College of VirginiaVirginia Commonwealth UniversityUSA