International Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 44–50

History of depression, race, and cardiovascular risk in cardia

  • Sarah Knox
  • Adelaide Barnes
  • Catarina Kiefe
  • Cara E. Lewis
  • Carlos Iribarren
  • Karen A. Matthews
  • Nathan D. Wong
  • Mary Whooley
Article

DOI: 10.1207/s15327558ijbm1301_6

Cite this article as:
Knox, S., Barnes, A., Kiefe, C. et al. Int. J. Behav. Med. (2006) 13: 44. doi:10.1207/s15327558ijbm1301_6

Abstract

Though previous data indicate a positive association between depression and coronary heart disease, the mechanisms mediating these associations remain unclear. These prospective analyses assessed the association between history of Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale depression and possible mediators of cardiovascular risk at Year 15 of follow-up in African Americans (AA) and Caucasians (C) in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study. Physiological assessments included plasma levels of low-density-lipoprotein cholestrol (LDL), high-density-lipoprotein cholestrol (HDL), total cholesterol, triglycerides and fasting glucose, diabetes and blood pressure. Behavioral risk factors included alcohol consumption, smoking, physical activity, and body mass index (BMI). AA’s showed significant associations between history of depression and diabetes that did not exist in Cs and AA women had significantly more episodes of depression than any other group. However, associations of depression with smoking, BMI, and physical activity were consistent across groups in the expected direction. HDL-cholesterol was positively and LDL-cholesterol inversely associated with depression in Cs, which was unexpected. These data indicate that in this still healthy cohort, there are already associations between depression and factors that predispose to cardiovascular risk.

Key words

depressioncardiovascular risk

Copyright information

© International Society of Behavioral Medicine 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarah Knox
    • 1
  • Adelaide Barnes
    • 1
  • Catarina Kiefe
    • 2
  • Cara E. Lewis
    • 2
  • Carlos Iribarren
    • 3
  • Karen A. Matthews
    • 4
  • Nathan D. Wong
    • 5
  • Mary Whooley
    • 6
  1. 1.Division of Epidemiology, Statistics and PreventionNational Institute of Child Health and Human DevelopmentBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Division of Preventive MedicineUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA
  3. 3.Division of ResearchKaiser PermanenteOaklandUSA
  4. 4.University of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  5. 5.Department of MedicineUniversity of California at IrvineIrvineUSA
  6. 6.Section of General Internal MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA
  7. 7.Division of Epidemiology, Statistics, and PreventionNational Institute of Child Health and Human DevelopmentBethesda