International Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, 11:225

Are stress related factors associated with alcohol intake?

Authors

    • National Institute of Public Health and the Environment
    • National Institute of Public Health and the Environment Centre for Prevention and Health Services Research
  • Marja Tijhuis
    • National Institute of Public Health and the Environment
  • A. Jantine Schuit
    • National Institute of Public Health and the Environment
  • Hans A. M. van Oers
    • National Institute of Public Health and the Environment
  • Paul G. Surtees
    • Strangeways Research Laboratory Worts Causeway
  • Johan Ormel
    • Department of Psychiatry
Article

DOI: 10.1207/s15327558ijbm1104_6

Cite this article as:
Loon, A.J.M.v., Tijhuis, M., Schuit, A.J. et al. Int. J. Behav. Med. (2004) 11: 225. doi:10.1207/s15327558ijbm1104_6

Abstract

Moderate alcohol consumption is related to reduced risks of coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality. Our goal is to advance our understanding of the associations between stress-related factors and alcohol consumption, using cutoff points for alcohol intake that reflect health benefits rather than health risks. Cross-sectional data were used from 4,131 respondents (age 20-65 years) participating in a cohort study in the Netherlands on psychosocial factors and cancer risk. Analyses were performed among drinkers only, for men and women separately. Heavy alcohol intake (≥ 3 glasses per day for men, ≥ 2 glasses per day for women) was associated with only a few stress-related factors in multivariate analyses. No significant associations between the total amount of stressors and alcohol intake were found. We conclude that stress-related factors are only marginally associated with a heavy alcohol intake compared with fair drinking, using the safe limits of drinking as cutoff point.

Key words

alcoholmoderatestress-relatedgeneral population

Copyright information

© International Society of Behavioral Medicine 2004