Annals of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 24, Issue 2, pp 88–99

Counterbalancing patient demands with evidence: Results from a pan-canadian randomized clinical trial of brief supportive-expressive group psychotherapy for women with systemic lupus erythematosus

  • Patricia L. Dobkin
  • Deborah Da Costa
  • Lawrence Joseph
  • Paul R. Fortin
  • Steven Edworthy
  • Susan Barr
  • Stephanie Ensworth
  • John M. Esdaile
  • André Beaulieu
  • Michel Zummer
  • Jean-Luc Sené cal
  • Jean-Richard Goulet
  • Denis Choquette
  • Eric Rich
  • Doug Smith
  • Alfred Cividino
  • Dafna Gladman
  • Yvan St-Pierre
  • Ann E. Clarke
Article

DOI: 10.1207/S15324796ABM2402_05

Cite this article as:
Dobkin, P.L., Costa, D.D., Joseph, L. et al. ann. behav. med. (2002) 24: 88. doi:10.1207/S15324796ABM2402_05

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the effect of Brief Supportive-Expressive Group Psychotherapy as an adjunct to standard medical care in reducing psychological distress, medical symptoms, and health care costs and improving quality of life in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods: A randomized clinical trial was conducted with 133 SLE female patients from 9 clinics across Canada. Clinical and psychosocial measures were taken at baseline, posttreatment, and 6 and 12 months posttreatment. Outcomes assessed were psychological distress, quality of life, disease activity, health service utilization, and diminished productivity. Results: Intention-to-treat analyses revealed that there were no clinically important group differences on any of the outcome measures. Conclusion: Although both groups improved over time on several measures (e.g., decreases in psychological distress, stress, and emotion-oriented coping), these changes could not be attributed to the psychotherapeutic intervention. Thus, evidence does not support the referral of these patients to this type of intervention.

Copyright information

© by The Society of Behavioral Medicine 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia L. Dobkin
    • 1
    • 2
  • Deborah Da Costa
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lawrence Joseph
    • 1
    • 2
  • Paul R. Fortin
    • 3
  • Steven Edworthy
    • 4
  • Susan Barr
    • 4
  • Stephanie Ensworth
    • 5
  • John M. Esdaile
    • 6
    • 7
  • André Beaulieu
    • 6
    • 7
  • Michel Zummer
    • 8
  • Jean-Luc Sené cal
    • 9
  • Jean-Richard Goulet
    • 9
  • Denis Choquette
    • 9
  • Eric Rich
    • 9
  • Doug Smith
    • 10
  • Alfred Cividino
    • 11
  • Dafna Gladman
    • 12
  • Yvan St-Pierre
    • 13
    • 1
  • Ann E. Clarke
    • 13
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Clinical EpidemiologyMontreal General HospitalMontrealCanada
  2. 2.Department of MedicineMcGill UniversityUSA
  3. 3.Department of MedicineUniversity of TorontoCanada
  4. 4.Department of MedicineUniversity of CalgaryCanada
  5. 5.Division of RheumatologyVancouver HospitalCanada
  6. 6.Division of Rheumatology, Vancouver Hospital Arthritis Research Centre of CanadaUniversity of BritishColumbia
  7. 7.Division of RheumatologyCentre Hospitalier de l’Université LavalCanada
  8. 8.Division of RheumatologyH äspital Maisonneuve-RosemontCanada
  9. 9.Division of RheumatologyHäpital Nätre-DameCanada
  10. 10.Rheumatic Diseases UnitOttawa General HospitalCanada
  11. 11.Division of RheumatologyMcMaster UniversityCanada
  12. 12.Centre for Prognosis Studies in Rheumatic DiseasesToronto HospitalCanada
  13. 13.Department of MedicineMcGill UniversityUSA