Annals of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 23, Issue 3, pp 149–157

Oral contraceptive use is associated with increased cardiovascular reactivity in nonsmokers

  • Sheila G. West
  • Catherine M. Stoney
  • Joel W. Hughes
  • Mala Matacin
  • Karen M. Emmons
Article

DOI: 10.1207/S15324796ABM2303_2

Cite this article as:
West, S.G., Stoney, C.M., Hughes, J.W. et al. ann. behav. med. (2001) 23: 149. doi:10.1207/S15324796ABM2303_2

Abstract

Women who smoke and take oral contraceptives (OCs) have significantly increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but the exact mechanisms for the increased risk are not known. Cardiovascular reactivity to psychological stress may be one mechanism for the enhanced risk, but the small number of studies examining whether OC users who smoke have greater reactivity have produced mixed results. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of chronic cigarette smoking, acute nicotine administration, and OC use on cardiovascular and lipid reactivity. Sixty healthy women, half of whom had been using OCs for at least the previous 6 months, participated in the study. Approximately two thirds were smokers and were randomized to be tested after either a 12-hr nicotine deprivation or administration of nicotine gum. One third were nonsmokers. Heart rate, blood pressure, and lipid measures were taken at rest, during a videotaped speech task, and during recovery from the task. Results indicated that, among OC nonusers, there was no effect of smoking status or nicotine administration on cardiovascular reactivity. However, among OC users, nonsmokers had significantly greater heart rate and diastolic blood pressure reactivity to stress. These data show that acute nicotine administration, in the form of nicotine gum, has no effect on cardiovascular or lipid stress reactivity in women. However, OC use among nonsmoking women is associated with greater cardiovascular reactivity to stress.

Copyright information

© The Society of Behavioral Medicine 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sheila G. West
    • 1
  • Catherine M. Stoney
    • 2
  • Joel W. Hughes
    • 3
  • Mala Matacin
    • 4
  • Karen M. Emmons
    • 5
  1. 1.Pennsylvania State UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Ohio State UniversityColumbus
  3. 3.Ohio State UniversityUSA
  4. 4.University of HartfordUSA
  5. 5.Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard School of Public HealthUSA