, Volume 34, Issue 2, pp 99-106

Identity, intended image, construed image, and gnreputation: An interdisciplinary framework and suggested terminology

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Abstract

Many scholars across various academic disciplines are investigating the following questions: What do individuals know or believe about an organization? How does a focal organization (and/or other interested entity) develop, use, and/or change this information? and How do individuals respond to what they know or believe about an organization? Cross-disciplinary research that centers on these questions is desirable and could be enhanced if researchers identify and develop consistent terminology for framing these questions. The authors work toward that end by identifying four central ‘viewpoints’ of an organization and proposing labels to represent each of these viewpoints:identity, intended image, construed image, andreputation.

Tom J. Brown (tomb@okstate.edu) is Ardmore Professor of Business Administration and a professor of marketing at Oklahoma State University. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His articles have appeared in leading marketing journals, including theJournal of Marketing Research, theJournal of Marketing, theJournal of Consumer Research, and theJournal of the Academy of Marketing Science. His current research interests include the causes and effects of corporate associations and the customer orientation of service workers. He is cofounder (with Peter Dacin) of the Corporate Identity/Associations Research Group. Dr. Brown’s teaching interests include marketing research, services marketing, and corporate communications. He is a coauthor (with Gilbert A. Churchill, Jr.) ofBasic Marketing Research (5th ed.), Southwestern, 2004).
Peter A. Dacin (pdacin@business.queensu.ca) is the Nabisco Brands Professor of Marketing at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Toronto. His primary teaching and research interests lie in the areas of corporate associations, identity and reputation, consumer and managerial judgment formation, andresearch methods and design. He has also published in the area of sales force management. His research has appeared in several leading journals, including theJournal of Marketing, theJournal of Marketing Research, theJournal of the Academy of Marketing Science, and theJournal of Consumer Research. In addition, he has published in numerous conference proceedings. He has served as the chair of the American Marketing Association’s Consumer Behavior Special Interest Group, serves on the Academic Council of the American Marketing Association, andis cofounder (with Tom Brown) of the Corporate Identity/Associations Research Group.
Michael G. Pratt (mpratt@uiuc.edu) is a James F. Towey Fellow and an associate professor of management at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Michigan. His articles have appeared in leading management outiets, includingAdministrative Science Quarterly, theAcademy of Management Journal, theAcademy of Management Review, andResearch in Organizational Behavior. He recently coedited (with Anat Rafaeli) a book titledArtifacts and Organizations: Beyond Mere Symbolism (Lawrence Erlbaum, 2006). His current research examines issues of organizational attachment (e.g.), identification and commitment), multiple identities and meaning, andintuition. Dr. Pratt’s work focuses largely on professionals in both traditional and dispersed work contexts.
David A. Whetten (d_whetten@byu.edu) is the Jack Wheatley Professor of Organizational Studies and director of the Faculty Center at Brigham Young University. Prior to joining the Marriott School of Management in 1994, he was at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign for 20 years, where he served as the Harry Gray Professor of Business Administration and director of the Office of Organizational Research. He was the founding editor ofFoundations for Organizational Science and served as editor of theAcademy of Management Review. His published scholarship has focused on interorganizational relations, organizational effectiveness, organizational decline, organizational identity, corporate social performance and theory development. His pioneering and award-winning management text,Developing Management Skills (Prentice Hall, 2005), coauthored with Kim Cameron, is entering its seventh edition. He has been very active in the Academy of Management. In 1994, he received the Academy’s Distinguished Service Award, andin 2000 he served as its president.