Academic Psychiatry

, Volume 33, Issue 4, pp 323–326

Personal Psychotherapy During Residency Training: A Survey of Psychiatric Residents

Authors

    • Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 3 Gates Circle, 8th Floor, Children’s Psychiatry ClinicUniversity at Buffalo
  • David Kaye
    • Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 3 Gates Circle, 8th Floor, Children’s Psychiatry ClinicUniversity at Buffalo
Brief Report

DOI: 10.1176/appi.ap.33.4.323

Cite this article as:
Haak, J.L. & Kaye, D. Acad Psychiatry (2009) 33: 323. doi:10.1176/appi.ap.33.4.323

Abstract

Objective

The authors investigate current psychiatric residents’ experiences with and opinions about personal psychotherapy.

Methods

The authors analyzed survey data from randomly selected students in psychiatric residency training programs during the 2005–2006 academic year.

Results

Approximately one-third of respondents were in psychotherapy. Being in a training program affiliated with a psychoanalytic institute and being further along in training were associated with a greater likelihood of being in therapy. Residents identified financial cost and training demands as the top barriers to pursuing psychotherapy. Psychodynamic psychotherapy was by far the most common type; few residents received cognitive behavior therapy.

Conclusion

A significant minority of psychiatric residents pursue personal psychotherapy, primarily psychodynamic. This number appears to be much smaller than in the past.

Copyright information

© Academic Psychiatry 2009