Academic Psychiatry

, Volume 29, Issue 5, pp 443–447

Do Data Obtained From Admissions Interviews and Resident Evaluations Predict Later Personal and Practice Problems?

  • Steven L. Dubovsky
  • Michael Gendel
  • Amelia N. Dubovsky
  • Joseph Rosse
  • Robert Levin
  • Robert House
Original Article

DOI: 10.1176/appi.ap.29.5.443

Cite this article as:
Dubovsky, S.L., Gendel, M., Dubovsky, A.N. et al. Acad Psychiatry (2005) 29: 443. doi:10.1176/appi.ap.29.5.443

Abstract

Objective

The authors assessed whether current methods of evaluating residency applicants and residents identify psychiatrists who later develop evidence of impairment.

Method

Residency admissions and performance data for all physicians who were enrolled in a psychiatry residency between 1965 and 1994 and who were referred to an impaired physician program up to 35 years later were matched for age and gender with a nonreferred physician from the same class.

Results

There were no significant differences between groups in admission interview assessments, performance ratings, or narrative observations by faculty during residency.

Conclusions

Standard approaches do not identify physicians at risk of later impairment.

Copyright information

© Academic Psychiatry 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven L. Dubovsky
    • 1
    • 2
  • Michael Gendel
    • 2
  • Amelia N. Dubovsky
    • 3
  • Joseph Rosse
    • 4
  • Robert Levin
    • 4
  • Robert House
    • 2
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity at BuffaloBuffaloUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Colorado School of MedicineDenverUSA
  3. 3.Medical Student EducationNew York University School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  4. 4.PsychologyUniversity of ColoradoBoulderUSA
  5. 5.Department of PsychiatryDenver Health Medical CenterDenverUSA
  6. 6.Erie County Medical CenterBuffaloUSA