Regular Article

The European Physical Journal B

, 86:232

Optical manipulation of complex molecular systems by high density green photons: experimental and theoretical evidence

  • Sorin ComorosanAffiliated withDepartment of Theoretical Physics, National Institute for Physics and Nuclear EngineeringInterdisciplinary Research Group, Romanian Academy
  • , Silviu PolosanAffiliated withMaterials & Multifunctional Structures, National Institute of Materials Physics Email author 
  • , Irinel PopescuAffiliated withAcademy of Medical Sciences
  • , Ioan StamatinAffiliated withDepartment of Biophysics, University of Bucharest
  • , Elena IonescuAffiliated withInterdisciplinary Research Group, Romanian Academy
  • , Sorin AvramescuAffiliated withDepartment of Chemistry, University of Bucharest
  • , Liviu Cristian CuneAffiliated withDepartment of Theoretical Physics, National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering
  • , Marian ApostolAffiliated withDepartment of Theoretical Physics, National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering

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Abstract

The recent revolution in modern optical techniques revealed that light interaction with matter generates a force, known as optical force, which produces material properties known in physics as optical matter. The basic technique of the domain uses forces exerted by a strongly focused beam of light to trap small objects and subsequently to manipulate their local structures. The purpose of this paper is to develop an alternative approach, using irradiations with high-density-green-photons, which induce electric dipoles by polarization effects. The materials used for the experiments were long carbon chains which represent the framework of biological macromolecules. The physical techniques used to reveal the locally induced molecular arrangements were: dynamic viscosity, zeta potential, chemiluminescence, liquid chromatography; mass spectrometry, and Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The principal result of our experiments was the detection of different molecular arrangements within the mixture of alkane chains, generated by our optical manipulations. This induced “optical matter” displayed two material properties: antioxidant effects and large molecular aggregation effects. In order to bring the experimental results in relation with theory, we developed a physical model and the interacting force between polarizable bodies was computed. By numerical calculations stable structures for N = 6 and N = 8 particles were obtained.

Keywords

Mesoscopic and Nanoscale Systems