Regular Article

The European Physical Journal Plus

, 127:76

High-pressure and high-temperature neutron reflectometry cell for solid-fluid interface studies

  • P. WangAffiliated withLos Alamos Neutron Science Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory
  • , A. H. LernerAffiliated withEarth and Environmental Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory
  • , M. TaylorAffiliated withLos Alamos Neutron Science Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory
  • , J. K. BaldwinAffiliated withCenter for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory
  • , R. K. GrubbsAffiliated withSandia National Laboratories
  • , J. MajewskiAffiliated withLos Alamos Neutron Science Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory
  • , D. D. HickmottAffiliated withEarth and Environmental Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory Email author 

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Abstract

A new high pressure-temperature (P -T Neutron Reflectometry (NR) cell developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is described that significantly extends the capabilities of solid/fluid interface investigations up to 200MPa ( \(\ensuremath \sim 30000\) psi) and 200 ° C. The cell's simple aluminum construction makes it light and easy to operate while thinned neutron windows allow up to 74% neutron transmission. The wide-open neutron window geometry provides a maximum theoretical \(\ensuremath Q_{{\rm z}}\) range of 0.31Å-1. Accurate T and P controls are integrated on the cell's control panel. Built-in powder wells provide the ability to saturate fluids with reactive solids, producing aqueous species and/or decomposing into gaseous phases. The cell is designed for samples up to 50.8mm in diameter and 10.0mm in thickness. An experiment investigating the high P -T corrosion behavior of aluminum on LANL's Surface ProfilE Analysis Reflectometer (SPEAR) is presented, demonstrating the functioning and capability of the cell. Finally, outlooks on high P -T NR applications and perspectives on future research are discussed.