, Volume 2, Issue 1, pp 19-26
Date: 08 Jan 2012

The effects of the relict microorganism B. sp. on development, gas exchange, spontaneous motor activity, stress resistance, and survival of Drosophila melanogaster

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Abstract

Relict microorganisms preserved in the permafrost of geological periods possess a unique resistance to unfavorable factors of the internal and external environment. Their metabolic, DNA repair, and growth capacities are still under discussion, but the very fact of their existence in permafrost during many thousands of years is evidence of their phenomenal viability. One of these bacteria (B. sp.) that was found in Yakutia and that proved to be capable of enhancing longevity and immunity in drosophila and mice (A.V. Brushkov et al., 2009) was tested in developing drosophila fruit flies as follows: a culture of B. sp. (1 to 500 million/ml) was added to the nutrient medium of Drosophila melanogaster and a set of indices characterizing growth rate and mortality at the larval and pupal stages was investigated. The level of gas exchange ( \(V_{O_2 }\) and \(V_{CO_2 }\) ), body weight, and stress resistance were investigated in imagoes hatched under these conditions. B. sp. induces dose-dependent growth acceleration and decrease in larval mortality. The increase in spontaneous motor activity, \(V_{O_2 }\) and \(V_{CO_2 }\) , and body weight, as well as resistance to heat shock and UV irradiation, were demonstrated for imagoes.

Original Russian Text © A.V. Brushkov, V.V. Bezrukov, G.I. Griva, Kh.K. Muradyan, 2011, published in Uspekhi Gerontologii, 2011, Vol. 24, No. 2, pp. 198–206.