Article

Polymer Science Series A

, Volume 51, Issue 6, pp 630-637

First online:

Structure and characteristics of the complexes between polyampholites and anionic liposomes

  • T. A. SitnikovaAffiliated withFaculty of Chemistry, Moscow State University
  • , A. A. RakhnyanskayaAffiliated withFaculty of Chemistry, Moscow State University
  • , E. G. YaroslavovaAffiliated withFaculty of Chemistry, Moscow State University Email author 
  • , A. N. Sergeev-CherenkovAffiliated withFaculty of Physics, Moscow State University
  • , G. B. KhomutovAffiliated withFaculty of Physics, Moscow State University
  • , V. Ya. GrinbergAffiliated withNesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences
  • , T. V. BurovaAffiliated withNesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences
  • , A. A. YaroslavovAffiliated withFaculty of Chemistry, Moscow State University

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Abstract

Polyampholites are synthesized by the alkylation of poly-4-vinylpyridine with ω-bromocarboxylic acids, and their interaction with the negatively charged bilayer lipid vesicles (liposomes) is studied. In the above polymers, quaternized pyridine units are zwitterion (betaine) groups, in which cationic and anionic groups are linked by the -(CH2) n -bridges. Via the methods of fluorescence, laser scattering, and DSC, the length of the ethylene spacer in the betaine group is shown to control the ability of the polymer to interact with anionic liposomes and induce structural rearrangements in the liposomal membrane. At n = 1, polybetaine is not linked to anionic liposomes. At n = 2, polybetaine is sorbed on the membrane, but it causes no dramatic structural rearrangements in the bilayer. At n = 3, the adsorption of polybetaine triggers the lateral segregation of lipids in the outer membrane layer. At n = 5, adsorption of polymer is accompanied by the lateral segregation and flip-flop of lipid molecules; as a result, all anionic membrane lipids are involved in the microphase separation. This evidence is of evident interest for the controlled design of polymers and related complexes and conjugates for biomedical applications.