Annals of Biomedical Engineering

, Volume 28, Issue 4, pp 351–362

Dynamic Mechanical Conditioning of Collagen-Gel Blood Vessel Constructs Induces Remodeling In Vitro

  • Dror Seliktar
  • Richard A. Black
  • Raymond P. Vito
  • Robert M. Nerem
Article

DOI: 10.1114/1.275

Cite this article as:
Seliktar, D., Black, R.A., Vito, R.P. et al. Annals of Biomedical Engineering (2000) 28: 351. doi:10.1114/1.275

Abstract

Dynamic mechanical conditioning is investigated as a means of improving the mechanical properties of tissue-engineered blood vessel constructs composed of living cells embedded in a collagen-gel scaffold. This approach attempts to elicit a unique response from the embedded cells so as to reorganize their surrounding matrix, thus improving the overall mechanical stability of the constructs. Mechanical conditioning, in the form of cyclic strain, was applied to the tubular constructs at a frequency of 1 Hz for 4 and 8 days. The response to conditioning thus evinced involved increased contraction and mechanical strength, as compared to statically cultured controls. Significant increases in ultimate stress and material modulus were seen over an 8 day culture period. Accompanying morphological changes showed increased circumferential orientation in response to the cyclic stimulus. We conclude that dynamic mechanical conditioning during tissue culture leads to an improvement in the properties of tissue-engineered blood vessel constructs in terms of mechanical strength and histological organization. This concept, in conjunction with a proper biochemical environment, could present a better model for engineering vascular constructs. © 2000 Biomedical Engineering Society.

PAC00: 8719Rr, 8714Ee, 8718-h, 8768+z

Tissue engineering Vascular Mechanical properties Cyclic strain Remodeling 

Copyright information

© Biomedical Engineering Society 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dror Seliktar
    • 1
  • Richard A. Black
    • 2
  • Raymond P. Vito
    • 1
  • Robert M. Nerem
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Bioengineering & BioscienceGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlanta
  2. 2.Department of Clinical EngineeringUniversity of LiverpoolEnglandUnited Kingdom