Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 19, Issue 5, pp 558–561

Feedback and the mini clinical evaluation exercise

  • Eric S. Holmboe
  • Monica Yepes
  • Frederick Williams
  • Stephen J. Huot
Brief Reports

DOI: 10.1111/j.1525-1497.2004.30134.x

Cite this article as:
Holmboe, E.S., Yepes, M., Williams, F. et al. J GEN INTERN MED (2004) 19: 558. doi:10.1111/j.1525-1497.2004.30134.x

Abstract

We studied the nature of feedback given after a miniCEX. We investigated whether the feedback was interactive; specifically, did the faculty allow the trainee to react to the feedback, enable self-assessment, and help trainees to develop an action plan for improvement. Finally, we investigated the number of types of recommendations given by faculty. One hundred and seven miniCEX feedback sessions were audiotaped. The faculty provided at least 1 recommendation for improvement in 80% of the feedback sessions. The majority of the sessions (61%) involved learner reaction, but in only 34% of the sessions did faculty ask for self-assessment from the intern and only 8% involved an action plan from the faculty member. Faculty are using the miniCEX to provide recommendations and often encourage learner reaction, but are underutilizing other interactive feedback methods of self-assessment and action plans. Programs should consider both specific training in feedback and changes to the miniCEX form to facilitate interactive feedback.

Key words

feedback direct observation evaluation 

Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric S. Holmboe
    • 1
    • 2
  • Monica Yepes
    • 3
  • Frederick Williams
    • 4
  • Stephen J. Huot
    • 1
  1. 1.the Yale Primary Care Internal Medicine ResidencyNew Haven
  2. 2.National Naval Medical CenterBethesda
  3. 3.George Washington University School of MedicineWashington, DC
  4. 4.Washington Hospital CenterWashington, DC
  5. 5.Department of Internal Medicine, Pomeroy 6Waterbury HospitalWaterbury

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