Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 16, Issue 10, pp 656–662

Quality of life is impaired in men with chronic prostatitis

The chronic prostatitis collaborative research network
  • Mary McNaughton Collins
  • Michel A. Pontari
  • Michael P. O’Leary
  • Elizabeth A. Calhoun
  • Jill Santanna
  • J. Richard Landis
  • John W. Kusek
  • Mark S. Litwin
  • the Chronic Prostatitis Collaborative Research Network
Original Articles

DOI: 10.1111/j.1525-1497.2001.01223.x

Cite this article as:
McNaughton Collins, M., Pontari, M.A., O’Leary, M.P. et al. J GEN INTERN MED (2001) 16: 656. doi:10.1111/j.1525-1497.2001.01223.x

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) impairment may be a central component of chronic prostatitis for men afflicted with this condition. Our objective was to examine HRQOL, and factors associated with HRQOL, using both general and condition-specific instruments.

DESIGN: Chronic Prostatis Cohort (CPC) study.

SETTING: Six clinical research centers across the United States and Canada.

PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred seventy-eight men with chronic prostatitis.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The Short Form 12 (SF-12) Mental Component Summary (MCS) and Physical Component Summary (PCS), and the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) were measures used. CPC subjects’ MCS scores (44.0±9.8) were lower than those observed in the most severe subgroups of patients with congestive heart failure and diabetes mellitus, and PCS scores (46.4±9.5) were worse than those among the general U.S. male population. Decreasing scores were seen in both domains with worsening symptom severity (P<.01). History of psychiatric disease and younger age were strongly associated with worse MCS scores, whereas history of rheumatologic disease was associated with worse PCS scores. Predictors of more severe NIH-CPSI scores included lower educational level and lower income; history of rheumatic disease was associated with higher scores.

CONCLUSIONS: Men with chronic prostatitis experience impairment in the mental and physical domains of general HRQOL, as well as condition-specific HRQOL. To optimize the care of men with this condition, clinicians should consider administering HRQOL instruments to their patients to better understand the impact of the condition on patients’ lives.

Key words

prostatishealth-related quality of life

Copyright information

© Blackwell Science Inc 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary McNaughton Collins
    • 1
  • Michel A. Pontari
    • 3
  • Michael P. O’Leary
    • 2
  • Elizabeth A. Calhoun
    • 5
  • Jill Santanna
    • 4
  • J. Richard Landis
    • 4
  • John W. Kusek
    • 6
  • Mark S. Litwin
    • 7
  • the Chronic Prostatitis Collaborative Research Network
  1. 1.the General Medicine Unit, Medical ServicesMassachusetts General HospitalBoston
  2. 2.the Department of Surgery, HMS, Division of Urologic SurgeryBrigham and Women’s HospitalBoston
  3. 3.the Department of UrologyTemple University School of MedicinePhiladelphia
  4. 4.the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and BiostatisticsUniversity of Pennsylvania Medical CenterPhiladelphia
  5. 5.the Institute for Health Services and Health Policy StudiesNorthwestern University Medical SchoolChicago
  6. 6.the Division of Kidney, Urologic, and Hematologic DiseasesNIH/NIDDKBethesda
  7. 7.the Department of Urology and Health ServicesUniversity of CaliforniaLos Angeles