, Volume 6, Issue 3, pp 179-183

Short-term exposure of female rats to industrial metal salts: Effect on implantation and pregnancy

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Abstract

Aim

The objective of this study was to characterize the adverse effects of industrial metal salts during the early stages of pregnancy.

Methods

Successfully mated female rats were exposed to the following metal salts via intragastric intubation; manganese sulfate, lead acetate, aluminum chloride, ferrous chloride and ferric chloride in doses of 50 mg/kg body weight and chromium chloride and potassium dichromate in doses of 25 mg/kg body weight on days l–3 or 4–6 of pregnancy. Female rats were killed on day 20 of gestation and the pregnancy outcome was determined.

Results

The administration of manganese sulfate, chromium chloride, potassium dichromate and ferric chloride to female rats on days 1–3 of pregnancy caused pregnancy failure. However, the administration of manganese sulfate and potassium dichromate reduced the number of implantations. The administration of manganese sulfate, potassium dichromate and ferric chloride reduced the number of viable fetuses. The total number of resorptions increased in the lead acetate, aluminum chloride, ferrous chloride and ferric chloride exposed groups. In contrast, the administration of manganese sulfate, aluminum chloride and ferric chloride on days 4–6 of pregnancy caused pregnancy failure. However, the administration of ferric chloride reduced the number of implantations. The administration of manganese sulfate, aluminum chloride, potassium dichromate, ferrous chloride and ferric chloride reduced the number of viable fetuses. The total number of resorptions increased in the manganese sulfate, lead acetate, aluminum chloride, potassium dichromate, ferrous chloride and ferric chloride exposed groups.

Conclusion

This work demonstrates that the short-term exposure of female rats to industrial metal salts during the early stages of gestation would cause failure of pregnancy and produce fetotoxic or fetal resorptive potentials.