Fisheries Science

, Volume 72, Issue 1, pp 149–156

Thermal adaptation of pacific bluefin tuna Thunnus orientalis to temperate waters

  • Takashi Kitagawa
  • Shingo Kimura
  • Hideaki Nakata
  • Harumi Yamada
Article

DOI: 10.1111/j.1444-2906.2006.01129.x

Cite this article as:
Kitagawa, T., Kimura, S., Nakata, H. et al. Fish Sci (2006) 72: 149. doi:10.1111/j.1444-2906.2006.01129.x

Abstract

Immature Pacific bluefin tuna Thunnus orientalis, tagged with archival tags, were released near Tsushima Island in the East China Sea during the winters of 1995 through 1998. Time-series data for ambient and peritoneal cavity temperatures, recorded every 128 or 256 s for 23 fish recovered, were analyzed. The objective of this study was to clarify the process of development of thermoconservation ability with growth in relation to adaptive mechanisms to cooler temperate waters. According to the results, mean ambient temperatures ranged from 14.9 to 20.7°C, which is almost within the optimum temperature range according to previous reports. Mean peritoneal temperatures were higher than ambient temperatures (19.7–27.3°C), but never reached 35°C, which would induce overheating. Although the mean thermal differences between peritoneal and ambient temperatures increased with body size, the rate of increase decreased with body size. A heat budget model suggests that as the insulation of the body develops, the estimated mean values of internal heat production decrease with body size. This is probably due to the allometric scale effect and explains why the thermal difference does not increase quickly with body size. It is likely that Pacific bluefin tuna inhabit cooler temperate waters in mid-latitude regions to avoid overheating.

Key words

archival tagbluefin tunainternal heat productionthermal adaptationwholebody heat-transfer coefficient

Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Fisheries Science 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takashi Kitagawa
    • 1
  • Shingo Kimura
    • 1
  • Hideaki Nakata
    • 2
  • Harumi Yamada
    • 3
  1. 1.Ocean Research InstituteUniversity of TokyoNakano, TokyoJapan
  2. 2.Faculty of FisheriesNagasaki UniversityNagasakiJapan
  3. 3.National Research Institute of Far Seas FisheriesFisheries Research AgencyShizuokaJapan