Journal of NeuroVirology

, Volume 12, Issue 2, pp 146–152

Use of laser capture microdissection to detect integrated HIV-1 DNA in macrophages and astrocytes from autopsy brain tissues

Authors

  • Melissa J. Churchill
    • The Macfarlane Burnet Institute for Medical Research and Public Health
    • The Macfarlane Burnet Institute for Medical Research and Public Health
    • Department of MedicineMonash University
    • Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyUniversity of Melbourne
  • Daniel Cowley
    • The Macfarlane Burnet Institute for Medical Research and Public Health
  • Luxshimi Lal
    • The Macfarlane Burnet Institute for Medical Research and Public Health
  • Secondo Sonza
    • The Macfarlane Burnet Institute for Medical Research and Public Health
    • Department of MicrobiologyMonash University
  • Damian F. J. Purcell
    • Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyUniversity of Melbourne
  • Katherine A. Thompson
    • The Macfarlane Burnet Institute for Medical Research and Public Health
  • Dana Gabuzda
    • Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDSDana-Farber Cancer Institute
    • Department of NeurologyHarvard Medical School
  • Justin C. McArthur
    • Department of NeurologyJohns Hopkins University School of Medicine
  • Carlos A. Pardo
    • Department of NeurologyJohns Hopkins University School of Medicine
  • Steven L. Wesselingh
    • The Macfarlane Burnet Institute for Medical Research and Public Health
    • Department of MedicineMonash University
Short Communication

DOI: 10.1080/13550280600748946

Cite this article as:
Churchill, M.J., Gorry, P.R., Cowley, D. et al. Journal of NeuroVirology (2006) 12: 146. doi:10.1080/13550280600748946

Abstract

The importance of astrocytes as a reservoir of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the brain remains elusive. By combining immunohistochemistry, laser capture microdissection, and triple-nested Alu-PCR, we demonstrate integrated HIV-1 in astrocytes and macrophages isolated directly from autopsy brain tissues of HIV-1-infected subjects. The ability of HIV-1 to integrate in terminally differentiated astrocytes suggests a permanent reservoir of provirus in brain that will impact the development and likely success of strategies aimed at eradicating HIV-1.

Keywords

astrocyteHIV-1HIVDHIVEmacrophageprovirus

Copyright information

© Journal of NeuroVirology, Inc. 2006