Acta Politica

, Volume 39, Issue 4, pp 407–421

Accounting for the Age Gap in Turnout

  • Daniel Rubenson
  • André Blais
  • Patrick Fournier
  • Elisabeth Gidengil
  • Neil Nevitte
Original Article

DOI: 10.1057/palgrave.ap.5500079

Cite this article as:
Rubenson, D., Blais, A., Fournier, P. et al. Acta Polit (2004) 39: 407. doi:10.1057/palgrave.ap.5500079

Abstract

We explore a number of explanations for the sharp difference in voter turnout between the post-generation X cohort and older citizens, using data from the 2000 Canadian Election Study. The gap in turnout between these groups is more than 27 percentage points. Controlling for socio-demographic factors reduces the age gap by almost a third. If we control for respondents’ perception of the closeness of the race in their riding, whether they were contacted during the campaign and whether they identify with a political party, the age gap decreases by a further three points — a reduction of 43% in the original gap. Contrary to conventional wisdom, we find that cynicism and negative attitudes toward politics and politicians are poor explanations for the discrepancy in turnout between young and old. Finally, if we include political information and interest in the model, there is no statistically significant difference in turnout between young and old citizens.

Keywords

voting turnout young voters age gap socio-demographics attitudes 

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel Rubenson
    • 1
    • 2
  • André Blais
    • 1
  • Patrick Fournier
    • 1
  • Elisabeth Gidengil
    • 3
  • Neil Nevitte
    • 4
  1. 1.Département de science politique, Université de Montréal, C.P.MontréalCanada
  2. 2.Department of GovernmentLondon School of Economics and Political ScienceLondonUK
  3. 3.Department of Political ScienceMcGill University, Leacock Building MontréalCanada
  4. 4.Department of Political ScienceUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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