Journal of Public Health Policy

, Volume 33, Issue 2, pp 173–187

Internet cigarette sales and Native American sovereignty: Political and public health contexts

  • Kari A Samuel
  • Kurt M Ribisl
  • Rebecca S Williams
Original Article

DOI: 10.1057/jphp.2012.4

Cite this article as:
Samuel, K., Ribisl, K. & Williams, R. J Public Health Pol (2012) 33: 173. doi:10.1057/jphp.2012.4

Abstract

Internet cigarette vendors (ICVs) advertise low prices for tobacco products, subverting public health policy efforts to curtail smoking by raising prices. Many online retailers in the United States claim affiliation with Native American tribes and share in tribal tax-free status. Sales of discounted cigarettes from both online vendors and brick-and-mortar stores have angered non-Native retailers and triggered enforcement actions by state and federal governments in the United States concerned over lost cigarette excise tax revenue. Examination of the history and politics of cigarette sales on reservations and attempts to regulate Internet cigarette sales highlights the potential role for greater use of negotiated intergovernmental agreements to address reservation-based tobacco sales. Our review notes global parallels and explicates history and politics of such regulation in the United States, and offers background for collaborative efforts to regulate tobacco sales and decrease tobacco use.

Keywords

tobacco Internet Native American American Indian cigarettes tax 

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kari A Samuel
    • 1
  • Kurt M Ribisl
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Rebecca S Williams
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Health Behavior and Health EducationUNC Gillings School of Global Public HealthChapel HillUSA
  2. 2.Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA
  3. 3.Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, University of North Carolina at Chapel HillNorth CarolinaUSA