Journal of Public Health Policy

, Volume 30, Supplement 1, pp S203–S220

Sociodemographic, Family, and Environmental Factors Associated with Active Commuting to School among US Adolescents

  • Susan H Babey
  • Theresa A Hastert
  • Winnie Huang
  • E Richard Brown
Schools and Youth

DOI: 10.1057/jphp.2008.61

Cite this article as:
Babey, S., Hastert, T., Huang, W. et al. J Public Health Pol (2009) 30(Suppl 1): S203. doi:10.1057/jphp.2008.61

Abstract

Active commuting (non-motorized transport) to school can be an important source of physical activity for children and adolescents. This research examined sociodemographic, family, and environmental characteristics associated with active commuting to or from school among 3,451 US adolescents aged 12–17 years, who responded to the 2005 California Health Interview Survey. Logistic regression results indicated that those more likely to actively commute were males, Latinos, from lower-income families, attending public school, living in urban areas, and living closer to school. Adolescents without an adult present after school and those whose parents know little about their whereabouts after school were also more likely to actively commute. Parental walking for transportation and perceptions of neighborhood safety were not associated with adolescent active commuting. Important family and individual correlates of walking or biking to school among adolescents were identified, even after adjusting for distance to school and urbanicity.

Keywords

physical activity walking bicycling children youth transportation 

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan H Babey
    • 1
    • 2
  • Theresa A Hastert
    • 1
  • Winnie Huang
    • 1
  • E Richard Brown
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.UCLA Center for Health Policy ResearchLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Department of Health ServicesUCLA School of Public HealthLos AngelesUSA

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