Journal of Public Health Policy

, Volume 30, Issue 1, pp 3–16

A case study of the New York City trans-fat story for international application

Original Article

DOI: 10.1057/jphp.2008.42

Cite this article as:
Tan, A. J Public Health Pol (2009) 30: 3. doi:10.1057/jphp.2008.42

Abstract

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in New York City and contributes to significant burden of disease in the United States and internationally. Excessive intake of artificial trans-fatty acids has been causally associated with increased risk of heart disease. This article describes New York City's 2007 trans-fatty acids regulation, which was aimed at lowering the prevalence of heart disease among the city's residents by prohibiting the use of trans-fatty acids in the preparation of food in the city's food outlets. The author describes sequentially: (1) formulation, (2) public consultation, (3) implementation and (4) evaluation of the policy. He proposes a strategic framework for food policy development for international policymakers who are considering similar regulations. The framework includes four domains: (1) background research, (2) stakeholder support, (3) effective policy implementation and (4) evaluation and dissemination.

Keywords

trans-fatty acidsNew York Citynutrition policy

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Annenberg School for Communication at University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Health Promotion BoardSingapore