Apidologie

, 42:192

Evaluation of colony losses in Israel in relation to the incidence of pathogens and pests

Authors

    • Department of Entomology, Institute of Plant Protection, Agricultural Research OrganizationThe Volcani Center
  • Amots Hetzroni
    • Department of Sensing, Information and Mechanization Engineering, Agricultural Research Organizationthe Volcani Center
  • Boris Yakobson
    • The Kimron Veterinary Institute
  • Dan David
    • The Kimron Veterinary Institute
  • Alina David
    • The Kimron Veterinary Institute
  • Hilary Voet
    • Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
  • Yossi Slabezki
    • Extension Service Ministry of Agriculture
  • Haim Efrat
    • Extension Service Ministry of Agriculture
  • Shlomit Levski
    • Department of Entomology, Institute of Plant Protection, Agricultural Research OrganizationThe Volcani Center
  • Yossi Kamer
    • Department of Entomology, Institute of Plant Protection, Agricultural Research OrganizationThe Volcani Center
  • Etta Klinberg
    • Department of Entomology, Institute of Plant Protection, Agricultural Research OrganizationThe Volcani Center
  • Naama Zioni
    • Department of Entomology, Institute of Plant Protection, Agricultural Research OrganizationThe Volcani Center
  • Shani Inbar
    • Department of Entomology, Institute of Plant Protection, Agricultural Research OrganizationThe Volcani Center
  • Nor Chejanovsky
    • Department of Entomology, Institute of Plant Protection, Agricultural Research OrganizationThe Volcani Center
Original Article

DOI: 10.1051/apido/2010047

Cite this article as:
Soroker, V., Hetzroni, A., Yakobson, B. et al. Apidologie (2011) 42: 192. doi:10.1051/apido/2010047

Abstract

To evaluate symptoms, extent, and possible causes of colony decline and losses in Israel, we carried out (1) a survey of honeybee colony losses and potential causes via mail and phone; (2) systematic sampling of healthy and problematic beehives after requeening in the winter; (3) detection of Varroa and pathogens including, viruses and Nosema ceranae, by microbiological means and sensitive RT-PCR. From 58 beekeepers (46 000 colonies) interviewed, 40% complained of extensive colony loses during 2008. Examination and sampling for pests and pathogens of 113 hives in the winter of 2009 showed 35% of hives with Nosema and 21% with V. destructor. The most frequent viruses detected were Black Queen Cell Virus, Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus, and Deformed Wing Virus. A significant negative correlation was found between worker population in the hive and the presence of viral and Nosema infections.

Keywords

Apis melliferaBee virusesVarroaNosema

Copyright information

© INRA, DIB-AGIB and Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011