Apidologie

, Volume 42, Issue 1, pp 23–28

Sperm utilization in honeybees (Apis mellifera scutellata and A. m. capensis) in South Africa

Authors

  • Michael J. Holmes
    • Behaviour and Genetics of Social Insects Lab, School of Biological Sciences A12University of Sydney
  • Michael H. Allsopp
    • Honeybee Research SectionARC-Plant Protection Research Institute
  • Lee-Ann Noach-Pienaar
    • Department of Botany and ZoologyUniversity of Stellenbosch
  • Theresa C. Wossler
    • Department of Botany and ZoologyUniversity of Stellenbosch
  • Benjamin P. Oldroyd
    • Behaviour and Genetics of Social Insects Lab, School of Biological Sciences A12University of Sydney
    • Behaviour and Genetics of Social Insects Lab, School of Biological Sciences A12University of Sydney
Original Article

DOI: 10.1051/apido/2010031

Cite this article as:
Holmes, M.J., Allsopp, M.H., Noach-Pienaar, L. et al. Apidologie (2011) 42: 23. doi:10.1051/apido/2010031

Abstract

We artificially inseminated queens of Apis mellifera scutellata and A. m. capensis with equal numbers of drones of both subspecies to determine the effects of sperm genotype on rates of sperm utilization. Contrary to a previous study we did not find a consistent overrepresentation of workers sired by A. m. scutellata males in the first four months after insemination. Interestingly, our study does suggest that there is a significant interaction between drone and queen genotype in both subspecies, with queens of each subspecies producing more workers sired by drones of the same subspecies.

Keywords

Apis mellifera scutellataApis mellifera capensissperm competitionAfricanizationhybrid zone

Copyright information

© INRA, DIB-AGIB and Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011