Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 18, Issue 10, pp 864–870

The long-term health outcomes of childhood abuse

An overview and a call to action

Authors

  • Kristen W. Springer
    • the Department of Sociology and Center for Demography and EcologyUniversity of Wisconsin
  • Jennifer Sheridan
    • the Department of Sociology and Center for Demography and EcologyUniversity of Wisconsin
    • the Women in Science and Engineering Leadership InstituteUniversity of Wisconsin
  • Daphne Kuo
    • the Department of Sociology and Center for Demography and EcologyUniversity of Wisconsin
    • the Department of Sociologythe University of Washington
    • the Women in Science and Engineering Leadership InstituteUniversity of Wisconsin
    • Department of Medicine and Psychiatry, Center for Women’s Health and Women’s Health ResearchUniversity of Wisconsin, Meriter Hospital 6West
Perspectives

DOI: 10.1046/j.1525-1497.2003.20918.x

Cite this article as:
Springer, K.W., Sheridan, J., Kuo, D. et al. J GEN INTERN MED (2003) 18: 864. doi:10.1046/j.1525-1497.2003.20918.x

Abstract

While the association between abuse in childhood and adverse adult health outcomes is well established, this link is infrequently acknowledged in the general medical literature. This paper has 2 purposes: (1) to provide a broad overview of the research on the long-term effects of child abuse on mental and physical health including some of the potential pathways, and (2) to call for collaborative action among clinicians, psychosocial and biomedical researchers, social service agencies, criminal justice systems, insurance companies, and public policy makers to take a comprehensive approach to both preventing and dealing with the sequelae of childhood abuse.

Key words

anxietydepressionhostilitymedical diagnoseschildhood abusesomatic symptoms
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Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2003