Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 14, Issue 7, pp 438–440

Practice guidelines and late-life depression assessment in long-term care

  • Deborah A. Banazak
  • Patricia B. Mullan
  • Joseph C. Gardiner
  • Srikanth Rajagopalan
Brief Reports

DOI: 10.1046/j.1525-1497.1999.04028.x

Cite this article as:
Banazak, D.A., Mullan, P.B., Gardiner, J.C. et al. J GEN INTERN MED (1999) 14: 438. doi:10.1046/j.1525-1497.1999.04028.x

Abstract

To determine how well nursing home physicians believe they can detect and treat depression, we conducted a national survey, eliciting a 63% response rate. More than 75% of respondents believed they detected and treated depression well. Excellent depression training (vs “good,” “fair,” “poor/none”) was associated with better self-reported recognition (odds ratio [OR] 14.25; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.81, 111.93) and treatment skills (OR 6.72; 95% CI 1.91, 23.64). Screening tool use predicted greater self-assessed detection (OR 1.89; 95% CI 0.92, 3.87) and treatment competency (OR 2.00; 95% CI 1.14, 3.50). Practice guideline awareness was associated with greater self-reported treatment competency (OR 2.47; 95% CI 1.56, 3.91).

Key Words

depression primary care nursing home 

Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deborah A. Banazak
    • 3
  • Patricia B. Mullan
    • 1
  • Joseph C. Gardiner
    • 2
  • Srikanth Rajagopalan
    • 2
  1. 1.Office of Medical Education Research and DevelopmentMichigan State UniversityEast Lansing
  2. 2.Department of EpidemiologyMichigan State UniversityEast Lansing
  3. 3.Department of PsychiatryMichigan State UniversityEast Lansing

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