Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 13, Issue 11, pp 740–745

Comparing standard care with a physician and pharmacist team approach for uncontrolled hypertension

Authors

  • Paul E. Bogden
    • the Department of Medicine, John A. Burns School of MedicineUniversity of Hawaii
    • The Queen’s Medical Center
  • Robert D. Abbott
    • the Department of Medicine, John A. Burns School of MedicineUniversity of Hawaii
    • the Division of BiostatisticsUniversity of Virginia School of Medicine
    • the School of NursingUniversity of Hawaii
  • Pam Williamson
    • The Queen’s Medical Center
    • Northern Virginia Kaiser Permanente
  • Janet K. Onopa
    • the Department of Medicine, John A. Burns School of MedicineUniversity of Hawaii
    • The Queen’s Medical Center
  • Leann M. Koontz
    • The Queen’s Medical Center
Original Articles

DOI: 10.1046/j.1525-1497.1998.00225.x

Cite this article as:
Bogden, P.E., Abbott, R.D., Williamson, P. et al. J GEN INTERN MED (1998) 13: 740. doi:10.1046/j.1525-1497.1998.00225.x

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of a physician and pharmacist teamwork approach to uncontrolled hypertension in a medical resident teaching clinic, for patients who failed to meet the recommended goals of the fifth Joint National Commission on Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Pressure.

HYPOTHESIS: Physician and pharmacist teamwork can improve the rate of meeting national blood pressure goals in patients with previously uncontrolled hypertension.

DESIGN: A single-blinded randomized controlled trial lasting 6 months.

SETTING: A primary care outpatient teaching clinic.

PATIENTS: A sample of 95 adult hypertensive patients who failed to meet national blood pressure goals based on three consecutive visits over a 6-month period.

INTERVENTION: Patients were randomly assigned to a control arm of standard medical care or to an intervention arm in which a physician and pharmacist worked together as a team.

MAIN RESULTS: At study completion, the percentage of patients achieving national goals due to intervention was more than double the percentage in the control arm (55% vs 20%, p < .001). Systolic blood pressure declined 23 mm Hg in the intervention arm versus 11 mm Hg in the control arm (p < .01). Diastolic blood pressure declined 14 and 3 mm Hg in the intervention and control arms, respectively (p < .001). The intervention worked equally as well in men and women and demonstrated noticeable promise in a minority of mixed-ancestry Hawaiians in whom hypertension is of special concern.

CONCLUSIONS: Patients who fail to achieve national blood pressure goals under standard outpatient medical care may benefit from a program that includes a physician and pharmacist teamwork approach.

Key words

blood pressurecoronary heart diseaserisk factorpharmacistambulatory care

Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 1998