Archives of Sexual Behavior

, Volume 26, Issue 3, pp 231–241

Effect of Testosterone Administration on Sexual Behavior and Mood in Men with Erectile Dysfunction

  • Raul C. Schiavi
  • Daniel White
  • John Mandeli
  • Alice C. Levine
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1024518730222

Cite this article as:
Schiavi, R.C., White, D., Mandeli, J. et al. Arch Sex Behav (1997) 26: 231. doi:10.1023/A:1024518730222

Abstract

This double-blind placebo controlled, cross-over study was carried out to assess the effect of testosterone administration on sexual behavior mood, and psychological symptoms in healthy men with erectile dysfunction. Biweekly injections of 200 mg of testosterone enanthate were given over a period of 6 weeks separated by a washout period of 4 weeks. Blood samples for hormonal assessment, behavioral and psychological ratings were obtained prior to each injection. Luteinizing hormone remained significantly depressed but circulating testosterone had returned to baseline levels by 2 weeks following each hormonal injection. The ejaculatory frequency during the testosterone phase was statistically higher than during the placebo phase. There were marked, although statistically nonsignificant, increases in median frequency of reported sexual desire, masturbation, sexual experiences with partner, and sleep erections during the testosterone period. Testosterone did not have demonstrable effects on ratings of penile rigidity and sexual satisfaction. Mood variables and psychological symptoms did not change following hormonal administration. Results suggest that androgen administration to eugonadal men with erectile dysfunction may activate their sexual behavior without enhancing erectile capacity and without effects on mood and psychological symptoms.

testosterone androgens luteinizing hormone sexual behavior erectile dysfunction 

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raul C. Schiavi
    • 1
  • Daniel White
    • 2
  • John Mandeli
    • 2
  • Alice C. Levine
    • 2
  1. 1.Human Sexuality Program, Department of PsychiatryMount Sinai School of MedicineNew York
  2. 2.The Mount Sinai School of MedicineNew York

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