Biodiversity & Conservation

, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 597–612

Earlier plant flowering in spring as a response to global warming in the Washington, DC, area

  • Mones S. Abu-Asab
  • Paul M. Peterson
  • Stanwyn G. Shetler
  • Sylvia S. Orli
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1016667125469

Cite this article as:
Abu-Asab, M.S., Peterson, P.M., Shetler, S.G. et al. Biodiversity and Conservation (2001) 10: 597. doi:10.1023/A:1016667125469

Abstract

Evidence for global warming is inferred from spring advances in first-flowering in plants. The trend of average first-flowering times per year for the study group shows a significant advance of 2.4 days over a 30-year period. When 11 species that exhibit later first-flowering times are excluded from the data set, the remaining 89 show a significant advance of 4.5 days. Significant trends for earlier-flowering species range from -3.2 to -46 days, while those for later-flowering species range from +3.1 to +10.4 days. Advances of first-flowering in these 89 species are directly correlated with local increase in minimum temperature (Tmin).

first-floweringglobal warmingminimum temperaturespring-floweringWashington DC

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mones S. Abu-Asab
    • 1
  • Paul M. Peterson
    • 2
  • Stanwyn G. Shetler
    • 2
  • Sylvia S. Orli
    • 2
  1. 1.Section of Ultrastructural Pathology, Laboratory of PathologyNational Cancer InstituteBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Botany, National Museum of Natural HistorySmithsonian InstitutionWashingtonUSA