Photosynthesis Research

, Volume 70, Issue 1, pp 19–41

The home stretch, a first analysis of the nearly completed genome of Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1

  • Chris Mackenzie
  • Madhusudan Choudhary
  • Frank W. Larimer
  • Paul F. Predki
  • Stephanie Stilwagen
  • Judith P. Armitage
  • Robert D. Barber
  • Timothy J. Donohue
  • Jonathan P. Hosler
  • Jack E. Newman
  • James P. Shapleigh
  • R. Elizabeth Sockett
  • Jill Zeilstra-Ryalls
  • Samuel Kaplan
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1013831823701

Cite this article as:
Mackenzie, C., Choudhary, M., Larimer, F.W. et al. Photosynthesis Research (2001) 70: 19. doi:10.1023/A:1013831823701

Abstract

Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 is an α-3 purple nonsulfur eubacterium with an extensive metabolic repertoire. Under anaerobic conditions, it is able to grow by photosynthesis, respiration and fermentation. Photosynthesis may be photoheterotrophic using organic compounds as both a carbon and a reducing source, or photoautotrophic using carbon dioxide as the sole carbon source and hydrogen as the source of reducing power. In addition, R. sphaeroides can grow both chemoheterotrophically and chemoautotrophically. The structural components of this metabolically diverse organism and their modes of integrated regulation are encoded by a genome of ∼4.5 Mb in size. The genome comprises two chromosomes CI and CII (2.9 and 0.9 Mb, respectively) and five other replicons. Sequencing of the genome has been carried out by two groups, the Joint Genome Institute, which carried out shotgun-sequencing of the entire genome and The University of Texas-Houston Medical School, which carried out a targeted sequencing strategy of CII. Here we describe our current understanding of the genome when data from both of these groups are combined. Previous work had suggested that the two chromosomes are equal partners sharing responsibilities for fundamental cellular processes. This view has been reinforced by our preliminary analysis of the virtually completed genome sequence. We also have some evidence to suggest that two of the plasmids, pRS241a and pRS241b encode chromosomal type functions and their role may be more than that of accessory elements, perhaps representing replicons in a transition state.

complexity flagella gene duplication genome heme biosythesis nitrogen oxide reductase scaffold sequencing sigma factors terminal oxidases 

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chris Mackenzie
    • 1
  • Madhusudan Choudhary
    • 1
  • Frank W. Larimer
    • 2
  • Paul F. Predki
    • 3
  • Stephanie Stilwagen
    • 3
  • Judith P. Armitage
    • 4
  • Robert D. Barber
    • 5
  • Timothy J. Donohue
    • 6
  • Jonathan P. Hosler
    • 7
  • Jack E. Newman
    • 6
  • James P. Shapleigh
    • 8
  • R. Elizabeth Sockett
    • 9
  • Jill Zeilstra-Ryalls
    • 10
  • Samuel Kaplan
    • 11
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and Molecular GeneticsUniversity of Texas-Houston Medical SchoolHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Life Sciences Division, 1060 Commerce ParkOak Ridge National LaboratoryOak RidgeUSA
  3. 3.DOE Joint Genome InstituteWalnut CreekUSA
  4. 4.Department of BiochemistryUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK
  5. 5.Department of Biological SciencesUniversity of Wisconsin-ParksideKenoshaUSA
  6. 6.Bacteriology DepartmentUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA
  7. 7.Department of BiochemistryUniversity of Mississippi Medical CenterJacksonUSA
  8. 8.Department of Microbiology, Wing HallCornell UniversityIthacaUSA
  9. 9.Institute of GeneticsUniversity of Nottingham, QMCNottinghamUK
  10. 10.Department of Biological SciencesOakland UniversityRochesterUSA
  11. 11.Department of Microbiology and Molecular GeneticsUniversity of Texas-Houston Medical SchoolHoustonUSA

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