Prevention Science

, Volume 2, Issue 2, pp 71–89

Effects of the Positive Action Program on Achievement and Discipline: Two Matched-Control Comparisons

Authors

  • Brian R. Flay
    • Health Research and Policy Centers, School of Public HealthUniversity of Illinois at Chicago
  • Carol G. Allred
    • Positive Action, Inc.
  • Nicole Ordway
    • Health Research and Policy Centers, School of Public HealthUniversity of Illinois at Chicago
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1011591613728

Cite this article as:
Flay, B.R., Allred, C.G. & Ordway, N. Prev Sci (2001) 2: 71. doi:10.1023/A:1011591613728

Abstract

This paper reports on the effectiveness of an integrated comprehensive school model for character development, problem behavior prevention, and academic achievement enhancement. The Positive Action program consists of a school curriculum, together with schoolwide climate, family, and community components. As evaluated here, the yearly K-6 curriculum consists of over 140 fifteen-to-twenty-minute lessons per year delivered in school classrooms on an almost daily basis. The program is based on theories of self-concept, learning, behavior, and school ecology. We use a matched control design and school-level achievement and disciplinary data to evaluate program effects on student performance and behavior in two separate school districts. The program improved achievement by 16% in one district and 52% in another, and reduced disciplinary referrals by 78% in one district and 85% in the other. We discuss implications of these replicated findings for the prevention of substance abuse and violence, the improvement of school performance, and the reform of American schools.

preventionachievementmatched-controlself-conceptviolencediscipline

Copyright information

© Society for Prevention Research 2001