Biogeochemistry

, Volume 36, Issue 3, pp 239–260

Carbon storage in forest soil of Finland. 1. Effect of thermoclimate

Authors

  • JARI LISKI
    • Department of Forest EcologyUniversity of Helsinki
  • JOHAN WESTMAN
    • Department of Forest EcologyUniversity of Helsinki
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1005711024022

Cite this article as:
LISKI, J. & WESTMAN, J. Biogeochemistry (1997) 36: 239. doi:10.1023/A:1005711024022

Abstract

A total of 30 coniferous forest sites representing two productivityclasses, forest types, were investigated on a temperature gradient(effective temperature sum using +5°C threshold 800–1300degree-days and annual mean temperature –0.6–+3.9°C) inFinland for studying the effect of thermoclimate on the soil C storage.Other soil forming factors were standardized within the forest types sothat the variation in the soil C density could be related to temperature.According to the applied regression model, the C density of the 0–1 mmineral soil layer increased 0.266 kg m–2 for every 100 degree-dayincrease in the temperature sum, and the layer contained 57% and28% more C under the warmest conditions of the gradient comparedto the coolest in the less and more productive forest type, respectively.Accordingly, this soil layer was estimated to contain 23 more C ina new equilibrium with a 4°C higher annual meantemperature in Finland. The C density of the organic layer was notassociated with temperature. Both soil layers contained more C at thesites of the more productive forest type, and the forest type explained36% and 70% of the variation in the C density of the organic and 0–1m layers, respectively. Within the forest types, the temperature sumaccounted for 33–41% of the variation in the 0–1 m layer. Theseresults suggest that site productivity is a cause for the large variation inthe soil C density within the boreal zone, and relating the soil C densityto site productivity and temperature would help to estimate the soil Creserves more accurately in the boreal zone.

boreal forests carbon balance climate change climatic warming podzols soil carbon

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997