Community Mental Health Journal

, Volume 36, Issue 5, pp 457–476

Support, Mutual Aid and Recovery from Dual Diagnosis

Authors

  • Alexandre B. Laudet
    • Institute for Treatment and Services ResearchNational Development and Research Institutes, Inc
  • Stephen Magura
    • Institute for Treatment and Services ResearchNational Development and Research Institutes, Inc.
  • Howard S. Vogel
    • Mental Health Empowerment Project, Inc.
  • Edward Knight
    • Mental Health Empowerment Project, Inc.
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1001982829359

Cite this article as:
Laudet, A.B., Magura, S., Vogel, H.S. et al. Community Ment Health J (2000) 36: 457. doi:10.1023/A:1001982829359

Abstract

Recovery from substance abuse and mental health disorders (dual-diagnosis) requires time, hard work and a broad array of coping skills. Empirical evidence has demonstrated the buffering role of social support in stressful situations. This paper investigates the associations among social support (including dual-recovery mutual aid), recovery status and personal well-being in dually-diagnosed individuals (N = 310) using cross-sectional self-report data. Persons with higher levels of support and greater participation in dual-recovery mutual aid reported less substance use and mental health distress and higher levels of well-being. Participation in mutual aid was indirectly associated with recovery through perceived levels of support. The association between mutual aid and recovery held for dual-recovery groups but not for traditional, single-focus self-help groups. The important role of specialized mutual aid groups in the dual recovery process is discussed.

Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2000