Plant Foods for Human Nutrition

, Volume 55, Issue 3, pp 207–218

Dietary fiber content of commonly fresh and cooked vegetables consumed in India

Authors

  • Farhath Khanum
    • Biochemistry & Nutrition Discipline, Defence Food Research Laboratory, Siddarthanagar
  • M. Siddalinga Swamy
    • Biochemistry & Nutrition Discipline, Defence Food Research Laboratory, Siddarthanagar
  • K.R. Sudarshana Krishna
    • Biochemistry & Nutrition Discipline, Defence Food Research Laboratory, Siddarthanagar
  • K. Santhanam
    • Biochemistry & Nutrition Discipline, Defence Food Research Laboratory, Siddarthanagar
  • K.R. Viswanathan
    • Biochemistry & Nutrition Discipline, Defence Food Research Laboratory, Siddarthanagar
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1008155732404

Cite this article as:
Khanum, F., Siddalinga Swamy, M., Sudarshana Krishna, K. et al. Plant Foods Hum Nutr (2000) 55: 207. doi:10.1023/A:1008155732404

Abstract

Legumes, leafy vegetables,roots and tubers, gourds and other vegetables were analyzed for total (TDF), soluble (SDF) and insoluble (IDF) dietaryfiber contents, both before and after cooking eitherby a conventional open-pan method or by pressurecooker. Data revealed a significant increase inSDF fraction with a concomitant decrease in the IDFfraction upon cooking by both the methods employed. Although the decrease in IDF matched the increase inSDF values in some cases, it was found to be more invegetables categorized as `other'. The dietary fiber values have also been reported on a fresh weight basis which may serve as a guideline for calculating dietary intake of eachcomponent by the consumer.

Cooked vegetableDietary fiberInsoluble dietary fiberSoluble dietary fiber
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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000