Water, Air, and Soil Pollution

, Volume 151, Issue 1, pp 117–134

Water and Fertilizer Nitrogen Management to Minimize Nitrate Pollution from a Cropped Soil in Southwestern Quebec, Canada

  • Abdirashid A. Elmi
  • C. Madramootoo
  • Mohamud Egeh
  • C. Hamel
Article

DOI: 10.1023/B:WATE.0000009910.25539.75

Cite this article as:
Elmi, A.A., Madramootoo, C., Egeh, M. et al. Water, Air, & Soil Pollution (2004) 151: 117. doi:10.1023/B:WATE.0000009910.25539.75

Abstract

Nitrate-N (NO3--N) pollution of water resources is a widely recognized problem. Water and nitrogen fertilizer are the two most important factors affecting NO3--N movement to surface and groundwater. Field trials were conducted from 1998 to 2000 growing seasons to investigate the combined impacts of water table management (WTM) and N fertilization rate on NO3--N concentration in the soil profile and in drain discharge. There were two water table treatments: free drainage (FD) with open drains at a 1.0 m depth from the soil surface and subirrigation (SI) with a target water table depth of 0.6 m below the soil surface, and two N fertilizer rates: 120 kg N ha-1 (N120) and 200 kg N ha-1 (N200) in a split-plot design. Compared to FD, SI reducedNO3--N concentration in the soil by up to 50% averaged over the two N rates. Concentrations of NO3--N in drainage water fromSI plots were lower than those from FD by 55 to 73%. These findings suggest that SI can be used as a means of reducing soil NO3--N pollution and drainage water NO3--N concentrations.

drainage nitrate nitrogen pollution water quality 

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Abdirashid A. Elmi
    • 1
  • C. Madramootoo
    • 2
  • Mohamud Egeh
    • 2
  • C. Hamel
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Natural Resource Sciences Macdonald Campus of McGill UniversityCanada
  2. 2.Department of Agricultural and Biosystems EngineeringMacdonald Campus of McGill UniversityCanada