Theory and Decision

, Volume 55, Issue 1, pp 1–44

Is the Person-Affecting Intuition Paradoxical?

  • Melinda A. Roberts
Article

DOI: 10.1023/B:THEO.0000019052.80871.b3

Cite this article as:
Roberts, M.A. Theory and Decision (2003) 55: 1. doi:10.1023/B:THEO.0000019052.80871.b3

Abstract

This article critically examines some of the inconsistency objections that have been put forward by John Broome, Larry Temkin and others against the so-called "person-affecting," or "person-based," restriction in normative ethics, including "extra people" problems and a version of the nonidentity problem from Kavka and Parfit. Certain Pareto principles and a version of the "mere addition paradox" are discussed along the way. The inconsistencies at issue can be avoided, it is argued, by situating the person-affecting intuition within a non-additive form of maximizing consequentialism – a theory which then competes with such additive, or aggregative, forms of maximizing consequentialism as "totalism" and "averagism."

Consequentialismutilitarianismperson-affecting intuitionmere addition paradoxtotal utilitarianismaverage utilitarianismParfitfuture persons

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Melinda A. Roberts
    • 1
  1. 1.College of New JerseyEwingUSA