Systematic Parasitology

, Volume 59, Issue 3, pp 211–221

Anthobothrium lesteri n. sp. (Cestoda: Tetraphyllidea) in Carcharhinus melanopterus from Heron Island, Australia, with comments on its site, mode of attachment, reproductive strategy and membership of the genus

  • H.H. Williams
  • M.D.B. Burt
  • J.N. Caira
Article

DOI: 10.1023/B:SYPA.0000048100.77351.9f

Cite this article as:
Williams, H., Burt, M. & Caira, J. Syst Parasitol (2004) 59: 211. doi:10.1023/B:SYPA.0000048100.77351.9f

Abstract

Anthobothrium lesteri n. sp. in Carcharhinus melanopterus from Heron Island, Australia is described and figured. A combination of characters, namely the number of testes, a weakly laciniate strobila and mature proglottis which is conspicuously longer than wide distinguishes it from other species that appear to be consistent with van Beneden's original concept of Anthobothrium. The scolex and the peduncle are relatively small and frail when compared with the rest of the strobila and with the detached proglottis. A myzorhynchus is absent and the stalked, undivided, simple bothridia have thickened margins. Two circular areas of muscles, which resemble accessory suckers, occur in the centre of each bothridium. There is a distinct cephalic peduncle with spiniform blade-like microtriches followed by craspedote proglottides which have a posterior four-lobed velum. Apolysis is well developed and the oncosphere has a polar filament and a dense covering of spines. Comments are made on the site, the mode of attachment, an aspect of the reproductive strategy of the new species in relation to intestinal eversion in some sharks, and membership of the genus.

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • H.H. Williams
    • 1
    • 2
  • M.D.B. Burt
    • 3
  • J.N. Caira
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Ecology & Evolutionary BiologyUniversity of ConnecticutStorrsUSA
  2. 2.School of BiosciencesCardiff UniversityCardiffUK
  3. 3.Biology DepartmentUniversity of New BrunswickFrederictonCanada

Personalised recommendations