Russian Journal of Genetics

, Volume 40, Issue 3, pp 326–331

Gene Pool Structure of Eastern Ukrainians as Inferred from the Y-Chromosome Haplogroups

  • V. N. Kharkov
  • V. A. Stepanov
  • S. A. Borinskaya
  • Zh. M. Kozhekbaeva
  • V. A. Gusar
  • E. Ya. Grechanina
  • V. P. Puzyrev
  • E. K. Khusnutdinova
  • N. K. Yankovsky
Article

DOI: 10.1023/B:RUGE.0000021635.80528.2f

Cite this article as:
Kharkov, V.N., Stepanov, V.A., Borinskaya, S.A. et al. Russian Journal of Genetics (2004) 40: 326. doi:10.1023/B:RUGE.0000021635.80528.2f

Abstract

Y chromosomes from representative sample of Eastern Ukrainians (94 individuals) were analyzed for composition and frequencies of haplogroups, defined by 11 biallelic loci located in non-recombining part of the chromosome (SRY1532, YAP, 92R7, DYF155S2, 12f2, Tat, M9, M17, M25,M89, andM56). In the Ukrainian gene, pool six haplogroups were revealed: E, F (including G and I), J, N3, P, and R1a1. These haplogroups were earlier detected in a study of Y-chromosome diversity on the territory of Europe as a whole. The major haplogroup in the Ukrainian gene pool, haplogroup R1a1 (earlier designated HG3), accounted for about 44% of all Y chromosomes in the sample examined. This haplogroup is thought to mark the migration patterns of the early Indo-Europeans and is associated with the distribution of the Kurgan archaeological culture. The second major haplogroup is haplogroup F (21.3%), which is a combination of the lineages differing by the time of appearance. Haplogroup P found with the frequency of 9.6%, represents the genetic contribution of the population originating from the ancient autochthonous population of Europe. Haplogroups J and E (11.7 and 4.2%, respectively) mark the migration patterns of the Middle-Eastern agriculturists during the Neolithic. The presence of the N3 lineage (9.6%) is likely explained by a contribution of the assimilated Finno–Ugric tribes. The data on the composition and frequencies of Y-chromosome haplogroups in the sample studied substantially supplement the existing picture of the male lineage distribution in the Eastern Slav population.

Copyright information

© MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica” 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. N. Kharkov
    • 1
  • V. A. Stepanov
    • 1
  • S. A. Borinskaya
    • 2
  • Zh. M. Kozhekbaeva
    • 2
  • V. A. Gusar
    • 3
  • E. Ya. Grechanina
    • 3
  • V. P. Puzyrev
    • 1
  • E. K. Khusnutdinova
    • 4
  • N. K. Yankovsky
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Medical Genetics, Tomsk Research CenterRussian Academy of Medical SciencesTomskRussia
  2. 2.Vavilov Institute of General GeneticsRussian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia
  3. 3.Kharkov Inter-Regional Center for Medical Genetics and Prenathal DiagnosticsKharkovUkraine
  4. 4.Institute of Biochemistry and Genetics, Ufa Research CenterRussian Academy of Sciences, UfaBashkortostanRussia