Molecular Breeding

, Volume 13, Issue 3, pp 251–261

An integrated genetic linkage map of pepper (Capsicum spp.)

Authors

  • Ilan Paran
    • Department of Plant Genetics and BreedingAgricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan
  • Jeroen Rouppe van der Voort
    • Keygene Genetics
  • Véronique Lefebvre
    • Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), Unité de Génétique et d'Amélioration des Fruits et Légumes, Domaine Saint-Maurice
  • Molly Jahn
    • Department of Plant BreedingCornell University
  • Laurie Landry
    • Department of Plant BreedingCornell University
  • Marco van Schriek
    • Keygene Genetics
  • Bahattin Tanyolac
    • Department of Plant Genetics and BreedingAgricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan
  • Carole Caranta
    • Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), Unité de Génétique et d'Amélioration des Fruits et Légumes, Domaine Saint-Maurice
  • Arnon Ben Chaim
    • Department of Plant Genetics and BreedingAgricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan
  • Kevin Livingstone
    • Department of Plant BreedingCornell University
  • Alain Palloix
    • Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), Unité de Génétique et d'Amélioration des Fruits et Légumes, Domaine Saint-Maurice
  • Johan Peleman
    • Keygene Genetics
Article

DOI: 10.1023/B:MOLB.0000022526.30914.31

Cite this article as:
Paran, I., van der Voort, J.R., Lefebvre, V. et al. Molecular Breeding (2004) 13: 251. doi:10.1023/B:MOLB.0000022526.30914.31

Abstract

An integrated genetic map of pepper including 6 distinct progenies and consisting of 2262 markers covering 1832 cM was constructed using pooled data from six individual maps by the Keygene proprietary software package INTMAP. The map included: 1528 AFLP, 440 RFLP, 288 RAPD and several known gene sequences, isozymes and morphological markers. In total, 320 anchor markers (common markers in at least two individual maps) were used for map integration. Most anchor markers (265) were common to two maps, while 27, 26 and 5 markers were common to three, four and five maps, respectively. Map integration improved the average marker density in the genome to 1 marker per 0.8 cM compared to 1 marker per 2.1 cM in the most dense individual map. In addition, the number of gaps of at least 10 cM between adjacent markers was reduced in the integrated map. Although marker density and genome coverage were improved in the integrated map, several small linkage groups remained, indicating that further marker saturation will be needed in order to obtain a full coverage of the pepper genome. The integrated map can be used as a reference for future mapping studies in Capsicum and to improve the utilization of molecular markers for pepper breeding.

CapsicumIntegrated linkage mapMolecular markers

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004