Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry

, Volume 260, Issue 1, pp 21–29

Antioxidant and oxidative stress changes in experimental cor pulmonale

  • Pawan K. Singal
  • Firoozeh Farahmand
  • Michael F. Hill
Article

DOI: 10.1023/B:MCBI.0000026047.48534.50

Cite this article as:
Singal, P.K., Farahmand, F. & Hill, M.F. Mol Cell Biochem (2004) 260: 21. doi:10.1023/B:MCBI.0000026047.48534.50

Abstract

Although right heart failure (RHF) contributes to 20% of all cardiovascular complications, most of the information available on RHF in general is based on the experiences with left heart failure. This study on RHF investigates changes in antioxidants and oxidative stress which are suggested to play a role in the transition from hypertrophy to failure. RHF subsequent to pulmonary hypertension was produced in rats by a single injection of monocrotaline (MCT, 60 mg/kg, i.p.). Based on hemodynamic, clinical and histopathologic observations, the animals were grouped in three functional stages at 1-, 2- and 6-week post-injection periods. In the 1-week group, RV pressure overload and hypertrophy, and a mild increase in antioxidant enzymes was seen. In the 2-week group, compensated HF, a significant increase in antioxidant enzymes, an increase in septal (IVS) wall thickness and leftward displacement of IVS without change in LV free wall were seen. In the 6-week group, lung and liver congestion, RVF and dilation, a decrease in antioxidant enzyme activities, increase in lipid peroxidation and severe bulging of the IVS into the left ventricle were seen. These changes in the hemodynamic, biochemical and histopathologic characteristics suggest that in early stages of MCT-induced pulmonary hypertension at 1 and 2 weeks, RV hypertrophy was accompanied by sustained hemodynamic function and an increase in antioxidant reserve. In the later stage at 6 weeks, clinical RHF was associated with abnormalities of the right heart systolic and diastolic function along with a decrease in antioxidant reserve. These biphasic changes in RV antioxidant enzymes, i.e. an increase during hypertrophy and a decrease in failure may suggest a role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of right ventricular dysfunction.

oxidative stressheart failurelipid peroxidationheart remodelling

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pawan K. Singal
    • 1
  • Firoozeh Farahmand
    • 1
  • Michael F. Hill
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Cardiovascular SciencesSt. Boniface General Hospital Research CentreWinnipegCanada