Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 23, Issue 6, pp 1505–1515

Cotesia glomerata Female Wasps Use Fatty Acids from Plant–Herbivore Complex in Host Searching

Authors

  • Mayumi Horikoshi
    • Department of Applied BiologyKyoto Institute of Technology
  • Junji Takabayashi
    • Laboratory of Ecological Information, Graduate School of AgricultureKyoto University
  • Shuichi Yano
    • Laboratory of Ecological Information, Graduate School of AgricultureKyoto University
  • Ryohei Yamaoka
    • Department of Applied BiologyKyoto Institute of Technology
  • Naota Ohsaki
    • Laboratory of Insect Ecology, Graduate School of AgricultureKyoto University
  • Yoshibumi Sato
    • Kyoto College of Medical Technology
Article

DOI: 10.1023/B:JOEC.0000006418.49537.5d

Cite this article as:
Horikoshi, M., Takabayashi, J., Yano, S. et al. J Chem Ecol (1997) 23: 1505. doi:10.1023/B:JOEC.0000006418.49537.5d

Abstract

Cotesia glomerata parasitizes early instars of the cabbage butterfly,Pieris rapae, in Japan. Female wasps antennatedRorippa indica leaves damaged by feeding ofP. rapae larva, but ignored artificially damaged leaves. Females also antennated filter paper containingR. indica leaf juice plusP. rapae regurgitant. Chemical analysis revealed five compounds in higher amounts in the infested edges of leaves than in artificially damaged edges. Among them, we identified palmitic acid, oleic acid, and stearic acid. Female wasps antennated filter paper containing each of these three acids. We discuss the function of these acids in the tritrophic context.

Cotesia glomerataPieris rapaeRorippa indicaplant–herbivore complexpalmitic acidoleic acidstearic acidtritrophic interactionantennation
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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1997