Journal of Business and Psychology

, Volume 18, Issue 3, pp 365–383

State and Trait Correlates of Job Performance: A Tale of Two Perspectives

  • Thomas A. Wright
  • Russell Cropanzano
  • David G. Meyer
Article

DOI: 10.1023/B:JOBU.0000016708.22925.72

Cite this article as:
Wright, T.A., Cropanzano, R. & Meyer, D.G. Journal of Business and Psychology (2004) 18: 365. doi:10.1023/B:JOBU.0000016708.22925.72

Abstract

The relative importance of dispositional and situational influences on organizational behaviors has been widely debated within the organizational sciences. In the current research, we report the results of two field studies that, taken together, provide an opportunity to examine the relative contributions of psychological well-being, positive mood, and negative mood as predictors of job performance. In Study 1, bivariate correlational analyses demonstrated that psychological well-being and negative mood, but not positive mood, were related to job performance measured over “the past year.” Hierarchical regression analysis found that psychological well-being was positively related to job performance, even when controlling for positive and negative mood. These findings were replicated and extended in the second study. In particular, bivariate correlational analyses demonstrated that psychological well-being and negative mood were predictive of job performance “at the present time.” However, unlike Study 1, hierarchical regression analyses found that both psychological well-being and negative mood were predictive of performance, even after controlling for each other and positive mood.

job performancepsychological well-beingpositive moodnegative mood

Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas A. Wright
    • 1
  • Russell Cropanzano
    • 2
  • David G. Meyer
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Managerial SciencesUniversity of Nevada, RenoReno, NV
  2. 2.University of ArizonaUSA
  3. 3.Central Connecticut State UniversityUSA