Surface modified superparamagnetic nanoparticles for drug delivery: Interaction studies with human fibroblasts in culture

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Abstract

The concept of drug delivery using magnetic nanoparticles greatly benefit from the fact that nanotechnology has developed to a stage that it makes possible not only to produce magnetic nanoparticles in a very narrow size distribution range with superparamagnetic properties but also to engineer particle surfaces to provide site specific delivery of drugs. The size and surface characteristics of the nanoparticles are crucial factors that determine the success of the particles when used in vivo. The aim of this study was to modify the surfaces of the magnetic nanoparticles with PEG to improve the biocompatibility of the nanoparticles by resisting protein adsorption and increasing their intracellular uptake. In this study, the poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG) modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been prepared and their influence on human dermal fibroblasts is assessed in terms of cell adhesion/viability, morphology, particle uptake and cytoskeletal organisation studies. Various techniques have been used to determine nanoparticle–cell interactions including light, fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The modification of nanoparticle surface induced alterations in cell behaviour distinct from the unmodified particles, suggesting that cell response can be directed via specifically engineered particle surfaces.