Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 33, Issue 6, pp 583–593

Commitment to Philosophy, Teacher Efficacy, and Burnout Among Teachers of Children with Autism

  • Heather K. Jennett
  • Sandra L. Harris
  • Gary B. Mesibov
Article

DOI: 10.1023/B:JADD.0000005996.19417.57

Cite this article as:
Jennett, H.K., Harris, S.L. & Mesibov, G.B. J Autism Dev Disord (2003) 33: 583. doi:10.1023/B:JADD.0000005996.19417.57

Abstract

Variables that may be related to burnout in teachers of students with autism, including commitment to an underlying philosophy of a treatment and professional self-efficacy, were explored. Teachers using one of two different treatment approaches to autism participated: those using Applied Behavior Analysis (n = 34), and those using TEACCH (Treatment and Education of Autistic and Related Communication-Related Handicapped Children) (n = 30). Participants completed the Autism Treatment Philosophy Questionnaire, developed by the authors to differentiate between the philosophy of the approaches; Teacher Efficacy Scale, and Maslach Burnout Inventory. Results indicate a significant difference in philosophical commitment between the groups, but no differences in teaching efficacy or burnout. The relationship between a commitment to one's teaching approach and certain dimensions of teaching efficacy and burnout was found to be significant. Implications include the need for adequate training of teachers of students with autism.

Autismapplied behavior analysisTEACCHteacher efficacyburnoutcommitment

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heather K. Jennett
    • 1
  • Sandra L. Harris
    • 1
  • Gary B. Mesibov
    • 2
  1. 1.RutgersThe State University of New JerseyNew Brunswick
  2. 2.University of North Carolina–Chapel HillChapel Hill