Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 82, Issue 3, pp 169–183

Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Replicon Immunization Overcomes Intrinsic Tolerance and Elicits Effective Anti-tumor Immunity to the ‘Self’ tumor-associated antigen, neu in a Rat Mammary Tumor Model

Authors

  • Edward L. Nelson
    • Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/OncologyUniversity of California
  • Darue Prieto
    • SAIC-Frederick, NCI-FCRC
  • Terri G. Alexander
    • Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/OncologyUniversity of California
  • Peter Pushko
    • USAMRIID, Fort Detrick
  • Loreen A. Lofts
    • USAMRIID, Fort Detrick
  • Jonathan O. Rayner
    • AlphaVax, Inc.
  • Kurt I. Kamrud
    • AlphaVax, Inc.
  • Bolyn Fralish
    • AlphaVax, Inc.
  • Jonathan F. Smith
    • AlphaVax, Inc.
Article

DOI: 10.1023/B:BREA.0000004373.09678.bb

Cite this article as:
Nelson, E.L., Prieto, D., Alexander, T.G. et al. Breast Cancer Res Treat (2003) 82: 169. doi:10.1023/B:BREA.0000004373.09678.bb

Abstract

Many tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) represent ‘self’ antigens and as such, are subject to the constraints of immunologic tolerance. There are significant barriers to eliciting anti-tumor immune responses of sufficient magnitude. We have taken advantage of a Venezuelan equine encephalitis-derived alphavirus replicon vector system with documented in vivo tropism for immune system dendritic cells. We have overcome the intrinsic tolerance to the ‘self’ TAA rat neu and elicited an effective anti-tumor immune response using this alphavirus replicon vector system and a designed target antigen in a rigorous rat mammary tumor model. We have demonstrated the capacity to generate 50% protection in tumor challenge experiments (p = 0.004) and we have confirmed the establishment of immunologic memory by both second tumor challenge and Winn Assay (p = 0.009). Minor antibody responses were identified and supported the establishment of T helper type 1 (Th1) anti-tumor immune responses by isotype. Animals surviving in excess of 300 days with established effective anti-tumor immunity showed no signs of autoimmune phenomena. Together these experiments support the establishment of T lymphocyte dependent, Th1-biased anti-tumor immune responses to a non-mutated ‘self’ TAA in an aggressive tumor model. Importantly, this tumor model is subject to the constraints of immunologic tolerance present in animals with normal developmental, temporal, and anatomical expression of a non-mutated TAA. These data support the continued development and potential clinical application of this alphaviral replicon vector system and the use of appropriately designed target antigen sequences for anti-tumor immunotherapy.

breast cancerimmunotherapyneurat tumor modelreplicon vector

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003