Neurochemical Research

, Volume 22, Issue 6, pp 735–741

Redox Changes in Perfusates Following Intracerebral Penetration of Microdialysis Probes

  • Matthew E. Layton
  • Jennifer K. Wagner
  • Fred E. Samson
  • Thomas L. Pazdernik
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1027362312381

Cite this article as:
Layton, M.E., Wagner, J.K., Samson, F.E. et al. Neurochem Res (1997) 22: 735. doi:10.1023/A:1027362312381

Abstract

Microdialysis probe insertion into rat cerebral cortex significantly affects the levels of redox-active substances in brain extracellular fluid. Ascorbic acid levels are high immediately after probe insertion, decline rapidly, and then rise as the rat recovers from anesthesia 5–8 hours after surgery. Uric acid is at a low level for 5 hours and then rapidly increases in parallel with ascorbic acid. High ascorbic acid levels immediately after probe insertion are likely due to a shift from intracellular to extracellular fluids, whereas the delayed increase in uric acid may be due to increased enzymatic formation. After removal from the brain, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in microdialysis samples produces catalase-sensitive oxidative chemiluminescence. Microdialysis samples also produce high level catalase-resistant chemiluminescence associated with ascorbic acid levels after penetration injury. Although ascorbic acid is likely an antioxidant at concentrations estimated to be in brain extracellular fluid, it may have prooxidant effects when complexed with transition metals released into the neuronal microenvironment during traumatic brain injury.

Ascorbic acid chemiluminescence hydrogen peroxide microdialysis trauma uric acid 

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthew E. Layton
    • 1
  • Jennifer K. Wagner
    • 1
  • Fred E. Samson
    • 2
  • Thomas L. Pazdernik
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesUniversity of WashingtonSeattle
  2. 2.Smith Mental Retardation Research CenterUniversity of Kansas Medical CenterKansas City